The Communication Process Scenario

How would I successfully communicate the implementation of an exciting new program into the school?

In approaching the communicating of a program to my fellow staff, I have considered the ‘Communication Process’ film clip on YouTube (reference below), observations of colleagues in communication/strategy delivery meeting settings and my own experience as a participant in staff meetings and professional development. In my opinion, reflection upon each of these factors can give a somewhat more clear perspective as to how you can successfully encode and transmit a message initially.

1. Sender:
Organise and plan the environment in which the message is to be transmitted. I have found that even the layout of seating can be a distraction in a presentation/meeting. I would try to set my seating out in a horseshoe/curved style facing the presenter. That way the attention and focus is upon the front where the message will be communicated.
Create a platform for the message that will be conveyed. I would perhaps send an email, both informing the staff of the upcoming delivery of a presentation concerning an exciting new program, and creating/generating some interest in the program. This may include a small insight into what is to come at the presentation – something exciting to gain interest and create a positive outlook towards the program.

2. Encoding:
Plan a presentation that contains positive information about the program. In my opinion, you need to really believe in what you are presenting. As discussed in the ‘Communication Process’ clip, people will accept your opinion based upon your body language more so than what you are verbalising. If you really believe in and embrace the qualities of this new program, you need to portray that with your body language such as open arms and positive gestures, rather than arms crossed or hands on hips etc. It is also beneficial to speak with a positive/passionate voice, and as openly as you can with plenty of eye contact.

3. Message:
Prepare a presentation that is accurately targeting the group you are presenting to. I would centre the presentation around the use of the program and how it will help/improve teaching and learning, how it will be a valuable resource for teachers and students, how it is better than the alternative/what is already in use. I would fill this with specific references to, and knowledge about, specific teacher’s needs. Reference what the teachers are currently/have previously taught and suggest how this program would be able/could of been able to assist and support to enhance their programs.

4. Decoding:
Allow time throughout the communication/presentation of message for the receivers to interpret and decode the message. Take time during the course of presenting to question the receivers on their understanding, ask if they require further clarification of what is being said. Contain information that is presented so that the receivers are not overloaded with information.

5. Receiver:
Be aware of the environment, recognise ahead of time any factors that may inhibit colleagues from receiving the message. Assess and plan for the mental state of the receivers and ensure that they will be engaging in the presentation at a time that they will not be preoccupied. Remove any distractions (I once had a colleague teacher who would disengage from any meetings or professional development if there was pencils/pens and paper around for her to doodle with), save any supporting documents or notes for the end of the presentation.

6. Feedback:
Assess and consider the feedback you are receiving during the presentation/communication. I would be looking for ways in which to hold the attention of my colleagues through creating an engaging presentation, however, if there is still people who are distracted yawning and somewhat disengaging, pre-plan ways to shake up the presentation to refocus the receivers upon the task. Involve them in some way, ask them for examples of their experiences that could be improved by the new program. Tell amusing and engaging anecdotes that relate in some way to the program and the benefits of its implementation. Have multimedia that can engage and support your presentation if possible. Have back up directions for the presentation to take if you need to reengage staff so that your message is successfully understood and received.

 

 

Mattalanis. (2012). How the Communication Process Works [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=q6u0AVn-NUM Minute MBA. (2012, November 13).

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